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CAT-5 Cable Crimping Tools

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We supply all kinds of  CAT-5 Cable Crimping Tools ,you are welcome to visit http://www.blf-tools.com/products/network-tools.html to get more detail.

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CAT-5 cables are the most commonly-used cables for wiring home networks and home entertainment setups. However, different connections require different types of connectors called registered jacks, each of which is identified by an RJ number. When making your own CAT-5 patch cables, you will use a crimping tool to attach the proper connectors to the cable. Most of these tools will work with several types of jacks; you need to make sure you get one that is designed to handle the jacks you will be using.

 



RJ45

These are the jacks used for most computer Ethernet connections, and are therefore the most common jacks used. They are also called 8P8C (eight position, eight contact) jacks. CAT-5 cables contain eight separate thin wires (also called conductors) that are wound together into four twisted pairs, and this jack uses them all.

Note that some RJ45 connectors are labeled as AMP connectors. These are different from regular RJ45 jacks, so the crimp tool must specify RJ45AMP to work with AMP-style connectors.

 

  • These are the jacks used for most computer Ethernet connections, and are therefore the most common jacks used. They are also called 8P8C (eight position, eight contact) jacks. CAT-5 cables contain eight separate thin wires (also called conductors) that are wound together into four twisted pairs, and this jack uses them all.

    Note that some RJ45 connectors are labeled as AMP connectors. These are different from regular RJ45 jacks, so the crimp tool must specify RJ45AMP to work with AMP-style connectors.
  • RJ11

  • RJ11 jacks are typically used for wiring single-telephone systems. They are also known as 6P4C (six position, four contact) jacks. Only four of the wires in the CAT-5 cable will be used, but it has become the preferred cable to use because of its superior ability to carry high-speed signals over long distances with very little signal loss. This is a function of the twisted wire pairs; the twists cancel out interference.

    RJ11 jacks are smaller than RJ45 jacks. Most crimping tools that work with RJ45 jacks will also work with RJ11 jacks.
  • RJ12

  • RJ12 is similar to RJ11, except it is a 6P6C (six position, six contact) jack. This means it uses six wires for its connections. Keyed telephone systems and PBX systems (the mini phone networks many businesses use for internal communications) use this type of jack.

    Crimping tools that work with RJ11 jacks usually work with RJ12 jacks, as the two are virtually identical. RJ45, RJ11 and RJ12 is a common combination for a crimping tool.
  • EZ-RJ12/11 and EZ-RJ45

  • The newest innovations in jacks are the EZ-RJ12/11 and EZ-RJ45 jacks. They are jacks designed to simplify the wiring of RJ11, RJ12, and RJ45 jacks. They allow you to insert the cable completely through the jack; making it easier to be certain the wires are in the correct position before crimping them in place.

    It is possible, with careful shopping, to get a crimping tool that works with all of the jacks listed above (except for the AMP types); just be prepared to spend more money for the versatility of a single tool.
  • These are the jacks used for most computer Ethernet connections, and are therefore the most common jacks used. They are also called 8P8C (eight position, eight contact) jacks. CAT-5 cables contain eight separate thin wires (also called conductors) that are wound together into four twisted pairs, and this jack uses them all.

    Note that some RJ45 connectors are labeled as AMP connectors. These are different from regular RJ45 jacks, so the crimp tool must specify RJ45AMP to work with AMP-style connectors.
  • RJ11

  • RJ11 jacks are typically used for wiring single-telephone systems. They are also known as 6P4C (six position, four contact) jacks. Only four of the wires in the CAT-5 cable will be used, but it has become the preferred cable to use because of its superior ability to carry high-speed signals over long distances with very little signal loss. This is a function of the twisted wire pairs; the twists cancel out interference.

    RJ11 jacks are smaller than RJ45 jacks. Most crimping tools that work with RJ45 jacks will also work with RJ11 jacks.
  • RJ12

  • RJ12 is similar to RJ11, except it is a 6P6C (six position, six contact) jack. This means it uses six wires for its connections. Keyed telephone systems and PBX systems (the mini phone networks many businesses use for internal communications) use this type of jack.

    Crimping tools that work with RJ11 jacks usually work with RJ12 jacks, as the two are virtually identical. RJ45, RJ11 and RJ12 is a common combination for a crimping tool.
  • EZ-RJ12/11 and EZ-RJ45

  • The newest innovations in jacks are the EZ-RJ12/11 and EZ-RJ45 jacks. They are jacks designed to simplify the wiring of RJ11, RJ12, and RJ45 jacks. They allow you to insert the cable completely through the jack; making it easier to be certain the wires are in the correct position before crimping them in place.

    It is possible, with careful shopping, to get a crimping tool that works with all of the jacks listed above (except for the AMP types); just be prepared to spend more money for the versatility of a single tool.